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WBAI Folio 

from the 

Pacifica Radio Archives 



This co\ cr sheet created b\ Internet Arehi\ e for t"omiattin2. 



ijubai 

PACIFICA RADIO 



30 E. 39TH ST.. NEW YORK 16. OX 7-2288. A non-commercial, listener-sponsored 
station broadcasting \he best in music and the spoken word. 

_ ^ _ ON THE AIR daily 8:00 AM to 4:00 AM (Sun. and Mon. nights 

QQ S lll# ""^'' '^'dnight). Transmitter located at 10 E. ^Oth St., 10.3 KW 
##•«# 111% e.r.p., 650' above av. terr. 



subscribers' 
fm station 

PROGRAM FOLIO 
FEB. 4 - FEB. 17 



Pacifica Foundation Nonprofit Listener-Subscription Radio. At San Pr«ncisce: 
KPFA, Berkeley 4, At Loi AngaUi 38: KPFK. Subscriptions transferable. 

VOL. 4, NO. 3, 1963. Published every two weeks. Times are approximate. Records: 
'm' approx. minutes playing time '*' indicates new recording. Datas (after an 
entry): past or future duplicate broadcast to accommodate both daytime and 
evening listeners. 



MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 

8:00 SIBELIUS' FIRST* a new recording of the 
composer's E minor Symphony, Op. 39, by the 
Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy 
(Col 5795). Feb. 7 

8:45 CHAMBER CONCERT the Lennox Berkeley 
Trio for Violin, Horn and Piano and the Mozart 
Quintet for Piano and Winds performed by the 
Dennis Brain Wind Ensemble, Cohn Horsely, 
piano, Monoug Parisian, violin; details, Feb. 11, 
5:45 p.m. 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Dr. David Stark Murray, Fellow of 
the Royal Society of Medicine (series). Feb. 1 

10:15 SING ME A SONG OF SOCIAL SIGNIFI- 
CANCE John Ohliger with songs about Taxes. 
Feb. 3 

10:30 AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC Bill Faier and 
Barry Kornfield present Negro Folk Guitar — 
with musical examples. Feb. 12 

11:30 CHILDREN FIRST! James Council refused re- 
cently to take part in a Civil Defense Drill at his 
school and his teaching license was revoked for 
this breach of discipline by the Board of Educa- 
tion. This program was recorded at a rally spon- 
sored by the United Federation of Teachers for 
Mr. Council's reinstatement. Feb. 5 

12:30 CELLO AND PIANO Feb. 5 
DVORAK Rondo in g, Op. 94 

(Navarra, Dussol) (Cap 18023) 5m 
TCHAIKOVSKY Pezzo Capriccioso, Op. 62 

(Navarra, Dussol) (Cap 18023) 5m 
SHOSTAKOVICH Sonata for Cello and Piano, 

Op. 40 (Rostropovich, Shostakovich) (Mon 2021) 
MENDELSSOHN Sonata No. 1 in B^, Op. 45, for 

Cello and Piano 

(Soyer, Wingreen) (Mon 2045) 21m 

1:30 THE STREETS OF POMPEII A BBC radio 
mosaic by Henry Reed which enacts the thoughts 
and activities of four groups of people wandering 
through the ruins of Pompeii on a hot summer day. 

3:00 ANOTHER SCOPES TRIAL? That's what pub- 
lisher Ralph Gingsberg of Eros magazine asked 
after being indicted by a Philadelphia Grand Jury 
on 19 counts of 'criminal obscenity'. In this inter- 
view with Dick Elman he explains his case against 
the nation's obscenity laws. 



3:30 EDINBURGH FESTIVAL, 1962 — IX A recital 
by the Australian Trio. Maureen Jones, piano; 
Brenton Langbein, violin; Barry Tuckwell, horn. 
The recital is preceded by a short talk on the 
festival by critic John Morris. Feb. 2 
DON BANKS Trio for Horn, Violin and Piano 
BRAHMS Trio in E\) for Horn, Violin and Piano, 

Op. 40 
BEETHOVEN Sonata in C for violin and piano. 

Op. 30, No. 2 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 CONCERTOS Feb. 6 

♦POULENC Organ Concerto in g 

(Biggs, Phila Orch/Ormandy) (Col 5798) 20m 
•SHOSTAKOVICH Concerto No. 1 for Piano, 

Trumpet and Strings, Op. 35 

(Previn, NY Phil/Bernstein) (Col 5792) 18m 
*POULENC Concerto for Two Pianos and Orch 

(Gold, Fizdale, NY Phil/Bernstein) (Col 5792) 

21m 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION Herman Benson, Editor, Union De- 
mocracy in Action (Series). Feb. 5 

7:15 PENDENNIS Beginning a serialized BBC ver- 
sion of the novel by William Makepeace Thacke- 
ray, scheduled at this time throughout this Folio. 
This evening. Part One: 'The Fair Ophelia'. 

7:45 ISRAEL FESTIVAL 1962 — IV The Israel 
Philharmonic Orchestra, the Rinat Choir Kol 
Israel Choir and Haifa Chamber Choir under Gary 
Bertini with Max Lichtegg, tenor, and Josef Tal, 
pianist. Feb. 5 

JOSEPH TAL Concerto No. 4 for piano and elec- 
tronic accompaniment 
PAUL BEN HAIM "The Vision of a Prophet" for 
tenor, chorus and orchestra 

8:20 MISCELLANY 

8:30 THE NEW NATIONS AND THE WORLD The 

Honorable Abba Eban, former Israeli Ambas- 
sador to the United States and former Israeli rep- 
resentative to the United Nations, and now head 
of that country's famous Weizmann Institute, 
speaks of the surprising transformations which 
have taken place in the past decade — a decade 
which has been dominated by the growth of two 
great movements: the growth of knowledge and 
the growth of freedom. Participating in the dis- 
cussion which follows Mr. Eban's presentation are 
W. H. Ferry, Scott Buchanan, John Wilkinson and 
William Gorman, all staff members at the Center 
for the Study of Democratic Institutions in Santa 
Barbara, California. Feb. 5 



9:45 RKPORT ON MIISIC Eric Salzman continues 
his review iif orchestras and conductors who have 
appeared in New York this season. In this pro- 
gram, the second devoted to vistors from abroad, 
he will discuss, among other things, visiting Rus- 
sian, French and German orchestras. In addition 
to the words, there will be music. Feb. 7 

11:00 MUSIC OF THK WORLD'S PEOPLES Henry 
Cowell. 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 SIGN-OFF 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 

8:00 CELLO AND PIANO music by Dvorak, Tchai- 
kovsky, Shostakovich and Mendelssohn; details, 
Feb. 4. 12:.t() p.m. 

9:00 ML'SIC FOR CHAMBER ORCHESTRA a new 

recording of George Barati's Chamber Concerto 
and a special tape of Scenes for Small Orchestra 
by Lawrence Moss; details, Feb. 10, 6:45 p.m. 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Herman Benson. Feb. 4 

10:15 THE NEW NATIONS AND THE WORLD A 

discussion by Abba Eban. Feb. 4 

11:30 LUTE SONGS OF THOMAS CAMPION per- 
formed by Rene Soames, tenor, with Walter Ger- 
wig, lute, and Johannes Koch, viola da gamba; 
from Archive 3004. Feb. 10 

My sweetest Lesbia; Though you are young; I care 
not for these ladies; Follow thy fair sun; My love 
hath vowed; When to her lute Corinna sings; Turn 
back, you wanton flyer; It fell on a summer's day; 
Follow your saint. 



WABI Program Folio 



Page 3 



12:00 A LONDON SYMPHONY The Symphony No. 
2 of Ralph Vaughan Williams. Sir Adrian Boult 
conducts the London Philharmonic Orchestra on 
London 56<*. Feb. 7 

12:45 THE BLACK GIRL IN SEARCH OF GOD 

George Bernard Shaw's preface to his play, read 
with suitable high accent by Bernard Mayes. 
Feb. 10 

1:15 ALL OF THE CHOPIN MAZURKAS* 51 

dances in three-quarter time. While the Mazurkas 
do not have the scope or range of, say, the Etudes 
or the Nocturnes, they show the composer's re- 
markable and original creative development in its 
clearest, most precise form. The complete set are 
performed in a recent recording by pianist Orazio 
Frugoni (Vox 2017). This program is continued at 
3:00 p.m. today. 

2:15 PHENOMENOLOGY Husserl's views and their 
development in contemporary philosophy are dis- 
cussed by William Earle, Professor of Philosophy 
at Northwestern University and author of Objec- 
tivity (Noonday). The interviewer is Cecil Hemley, 
novelist, editor, and critic. Feb. 9 

3:00 ALL OF THE CHOPIN MAZURKAS Con- 
tinued from 1:15 this afternoon. 

4:00 MISCELLANY 

4:10 ISRAEL FESTIVAL, 1962 — IV Works by 
Paul Ben Haim and Joseph Tal, performed by the 
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra, choirs and soloists. 
Feb. 4 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 JAZZ ARCHIVES Phil Elwood presents record- 
ings by Fats Waller. 

6:15 GOLDEN VOICES Anthony Boucher continues 
a series of obituaries. This evening, Mr. Boucher 
presents the conductor Sir Eugene Goossens 
(1893-1962) in his pioneer pre-electric recordings 
of Puccini and Wagner operas in English (with 



Adv't 



Jay K. Hoffman and George F. Schutz present 

Philharmonic Hall — Lincoln Center — Sun. Eve. Feb. 24, 8 :30 

Direct From Vienna ! Only American Appearance. 
The return of the pianists. 

PAUL BADURA-SKODA & JOERG DEMUS 

Program: Mozart : Andante con Variazoni (four hand) 

Mozart : Fantasy & Fugue in C, K. 394 (Badura-Skoda) 
Mozart: Fantasy in D Minor, K. 397 (Badura-Skoda) 
Mozart: Sonata in F, K. 497 (four-hand) 
Schubert: Sonata in A, Op. 120 (Demus) 
Schubert : Fantasy in F Minor (four-hand) 

Tickets : Orch & Loge : $4.00 ; First Terr. : $3.00 

Sec. Terr. $2.00 
At Box Office, by Mail, or by Phone : JU 6-8053 



Page 4 



WBAI Program Folio 



Florence Austral, Rosina Buckman, etc.), and 
violinist Roscha Seidel (1899-1962) in obbligatos 
to singers Charles Hackett and Miliza Korjus. 
Feb. 8 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION Norman Redlich, Prof, of Law, 
N. Y. U. (Series). Feb. 6 

7:15 PENDENNIS Part Two: 'Bearding the Lion'. 

7:45 FILM REVIEW Beginning a regular series 
prepared by Marilyn Goldin and Gary Carey, 
editors of The Seventh Art magazine. 

8:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC EN EVOLUTION 

Gunther Schuller. Feb. 8 

9:00 THE 1962 REITH LECTURES This Island Now 

Each year, the BBC invites an acknowledged 
authority in a particular field to undertake some 
study or original research and to give listeners the 
results in a series of broadcasts. They are known 
as 'The Reith Lectures' after the BBC's first 
Director-General. This year's lectures are given by 
G. M. Carstairs, Professor of Psychological Medi- 
cine in the University of Edinburgh, and honorary 
director of a Medical Research Council unit which 
is concentrating on certain aspects of psychiatric 
illness. Examining contemporary British society 
from the viewpoint not of the economist or the 
politician but of the psychiatrist and anthropolo- 
gist. Professor Carstairs particularly concerns him- 
self with the inter-action of tradition, social 
environment and personality. He considers in 
biological terms and in the light of modern psy- 
chology and sociology what has happened to the 
British nation since the beginning of the century. 
This is the first time since their inception in 1948 
that these lectures have been devoted to a subject 
of this nature. They are heard Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday evening in this Folio. Tonight's 
topic is 'StabiUty and Change in Social Environ- 
ment'. Feb. 6 

9:30 ADDENDA TO THE REITH LECTURES A 

reading of two items from the London newspaper, 
the Sunday Observer, concerning the Reith Lec- 
tures given by Professor G. M. Carstairs. The first 
is a news report and the second is an article 
entitled 'What Would Lord Reith Say?' by Barbara 
Wootton, distinguished sociologist, author and 
ex-member of the BBC Board of Governors. 
Feb. 6 

9:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL 1962 — Vin 

VIVALDI Concerto for oboe, flute, violin, cello, 

bassoon and harpsichord 

(William Webster, Susan Morris, Henry Aubert, 

Sue Willoughby, Toby Saks, Marolina de 

Robertis) 
RAVEL Trio in a for violin, cello and piano 

(Henry Aubert, Toby Saks, Jean Claude 

Pennettier) 

10:30 CHILDREN FIRST! James Council refused 
recently to take part in a Civil Defense Shelter 
Drill at his school and his teaching license was 
revoked for this breach of discipline by the Board 
of Education. This program was recorded at a 
rally sponsored by the United Federation of 
Teachers for Mr. Council's reinstatement. Speak- 
ing with him are Edward Gottleib, a high school 
principal; Charles Cogan, President of the United 
Federation of Teachers; Manfred Ohrenstein, 



N.Y. State Senator; and Tom Stonier, a physicist. 
Feb. 4 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 During the few weeks Mr. Fass' program has 
been heard, he has received many suggestions for 
names for the show . . . some of them unprintable. 
Following is a smattering of the printable ones: 
RADIO Audio Fringe, Free New York, Nedicks, 
Guerilla, Abreaction, Why Not?, Rat-Fink, Yeti, 
Nirvana. Also — The Fringe with the Program on 
the Bottom, Insomniac's Nightmare, The Four 
Hours of the Apocalypse, Listeners' Lukschen, 
Long Gone Nebbich Show, Show On and Show 
Forth, The Sorry Mess. In addition: Midnight 
Fasscination, Fass Hash, Fass and Superfass, Fass 
Asleep, and Fass Track. NOT GOOD ENOUGH, 
says Fass. Time for dignity, he says. So let him 
think of a title. 

4:00 SIGN-OFF 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 

8:00 SCHOENBERG'S PIERROT LUNABRE AND 
SURVIVOR FROM WARSAW *The former is 
performed by Bethany Beardslee; the latter fea- 
tures John Horton, narrator and the CBC Sym- 
phony and Festival Singers of Toronto. Both 
performances are directed by Robert Craft. For 
more details, see Feb. 17, 5:45 p.m. 

8:45 CONCERTOS* new recordings of the Poulenc 
Organ Concerto in g, the same composer's Two- 
Piano Concerto and the Shostakovich First Piano 
Concerto; details, Feb. 4, 5:45 p.m. 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Norman Redlich. Feb. 5 

10:15 ATTRAVERSO LO SPECCHIO a one-act opera 
based on Lewis Carroll by the young Italian com- 
poser Niccolo Castiglioni; details, Feb. 10, 3 p.m. 

11:00 TWO SCHOENBERG OPERAS «Die Glueck- 

liche Hand and Erwartung sung by Robert Oliver 
and Helga Pilarczyk on a new Columbia release; 
details, Feb. 10, 3:45 p.m. 

11:45 ADDENDA TO THE 1962 REITH LECTURES 

Feb. 5 

12:00 THIS ISLAND NOW The first Reith Lecture 
by Professor G. M. Carstairs: 'Stability and 
Change in Social Environment'. Feb. 5 

12:30 THE AGE OF THE TALKING MACHINE 

Byron Bryant with very old recordings. Feb. 15 

1:15 FIVE MONTHS IN KATANGA Albert Feath- 
erstone, who went to Katanga to make a pro- 
Tshombe movie for a 'right-wing' Santa Monica 
group and then defected, gives intimate glimpses 
of the political and domestic life in the dominions 
of the Union MiniSre. The interviewer is Dick 
Elman. Feb. 13 

1:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — Vm Music by 
Vivaldi and Ravel. Feb. 5 

2:30 SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL The Tennent Pro- 
duction Company's performance of the work by 
Richard Brinsley Sheridan, featuring Ralph Rich- 
ardson, John Gielgud, Geraldine McEwan and 
Gwen Ffrangcon-Davis. Full details on Saturday, 
February 9 



4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 WBAI Program Folio 



Page 5 



5:45 STRING ORCHESTRA the Solisti di Zagreb 

under Antonio Janiuro; from RCA 2653. Feb. 7 

♦COUPERIN Pieces en concert: Prelude, Sicili- 

cnne, Air de Diablc. Plainte. La Tromba 
•MOZART Divertimento in D, K. 136 
•CORELLI Concerto Grosso, Op. 6, No. 4 
•BRITTEN A Simple Symphony 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION To be announced. 

7:15 PENDENNIS Part Three of the BBC seriali- 
zation: 'The Primrose Path'. 

7:45 BOOK REPORT John Leonard 

8:00 THE WORLD OF MUSICAL COMEDY Stan- 
ley Green with music by Cole Porter written in 
the Twenties. Selections from "The Greenwich 
Village Follies', 'Paris', '50 Million Frenchmen', 
and 'Wake Up and Dream'. This program was 
scheduled before, but not heard. Feb. 11 

9:00 THIS ISLAND NOW The second Reith Lecture 
by Professor G. M. Carstairs: 'The First Year'. 
Feb. 7 

9:30 ISRAEL FESTIVAL 1962 — V The Israel Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra and the Tel Aviv Choir with 
Adele Addison, Raflaele Arie and Murray Dickie. 
Feb. 7 
HANDEL Judas Maccabeus (sung in Hebrew) 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLAISY OR NEWS SPECIAL 



12:00 RADIO. 



4:00 SIGN-OFF 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 

8:00 A LONDON SYMPHONY The Symphony No. 
2 of Ralph Vaughan Williams. Sir Adrian Boult 
conducts the London Philharmonic Orchestra on 
London 569. Feb. 5 

8:45 STRING ORCHESTRA 'Couperin, Mozart, 
Corelli and Britten performed by the Solisti di 
Zagreb; details, Feb. 6, 5:45 p.m. 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION To be announced. 

10:15 REPORT ON MUSIC Eric Salzman reviews 
orchestras and conductors who have appeared in 
New York this season. Feb. 4 

12:00 SIBELIUS' FIRST ♦A new recording of the 
composer's E minor Symphony, Op. 39, by the 
Philadelphia Orchestra under Eugene Ormandy 
(Col 5795). Feb. 4 

12:45 BEETHOVEN'S OPUS 130 *The Bj, Quartet 
performed by the Loewenguth Quartet as part of 
their recent set (Vox VBX 44). Feb. 17 



Adv't 



JANACEK 
SCHUBERT 

STRAVINSKY 



THE PREMIERE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES IN THE HUNTER PLAYHOUSE 

■ Thurs. Feb. 7: Works by Janacek; Stravinsky Octet / RUDOLF FIRKUSNY, pianist; Assisting Artists 

■ Wed. Feb. 20: Schubert: Die Schone MiJIIerin; Sonata, op. 42 / HERMANN PREY, baritone; 

ALFRED BRENDL. piano (N. Y. Debut) ■ Thurs. Mar. 21: Lecture on Leos Janacek by EVERETT HELM (Editor, 
Musical America) ■ Thurs. Apr. 25: Schubert: Schwanengesang; Janacek: Diary of One Who Has Vanished, 
ERNST HAEFLIGER, tenor; PAUL ULANOWSKY, piano ■ Mon, May 13: Works by Janacek and Schubert Octet 
/ WALTER SUSSKIND, piano (N. Y. Piano Debut); BEAUX ARTS QUARTET, Assisting Artists ■ Mon. May 20: 
Schubert: Die Winterreise; Sonata, op. 15 / MARY SIMMONS, soprano; LEONARD SHURE, piano. 

Prices: Subscription for all 5 concerts and lecture: $15.00; 12.50; (Students: $10.00). 

Individual Concerts: $4.00; 3.00; 2.50. Lecture $1.25. 

The Hunter College Concert Bureau, 695 Park Avenue, New York 21, N.Y. Telephone REgent 7-8490. 

Please enclose self-addressed, stamped envelope. 



Page 6 



WBAI Program Folio 



1:30 TOKAY TAVERN A documentary on the 
misery of skid row. Details on Friday, Feb. 8 

2:15 OTHER KNOWLEDGE Lenore Marshall reads 
her own poetry. Feb. 10 

2:45 ISRAEL FESTIVAL, 1962 — V The Israel 
Philharmonic Orchestra and the Tel Aviv Choir 
with Adele Addison, Raflfaele Arie and Murray 
Dickie, with Handel's Judas Maccabeus sung in 
Hebrew. Feb. 6 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 RUBINSTEIN PLAYS BEETHOVEN a trio of 
Beethoven sonatas recorded by Rubinstein on 
RCA 2654. Feb. 8 

*Sonata No. 14 in c^. Op. 27, No. 2, "Sonata quasi 
un Fantasia" ("Moonlight"); Sonata No. 26 in 
E(5, Op. 81a, "Les Adieux"; Sonata No. 8 in 
c, Op. 13, "Pathetique" 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION Herbert Aptheker, author and editor 
of Political Affairs, The theoretical organ of the 
Communist Party of the United States. Feb. 8 

7:15 PENDENNIS Part Four of Thackeray's novel. 

adapted by the BBC: 'Undine'. 
7:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL 1962 — IX Feb. 8 

SCHUBERT Fantasia in f for piano, four hands 

(John Browning, Charles Wadsworth) 
BRAHMS Sonata in F, Op. 99, for cello and piano 

(Toby Saks. John Browning) 
MOZART Quintet in Ef^ for piano and winds. 
K. 452 (Browning, Festival Qnt) 

8:45 MAKING RISKY DECISIONS A talk by Dr. 
Ward Edwards, Associate Professor of Psychology 
at the University of Michigan. (Archives) Feb. 10 

9:00 THIS ISLAND NOW An examination of con- 
temporary British society from the viewpoint of 
G. M. Carstairs, a psychiatrist and anthropologist. 
The third of six Reith Lectures, this one is en- 
titled 'Vicissitudes of Adolescence'. Feb. 8 

9:30 JAZZ IN THE STUDIO The Archie Shepp- 
Bill Dixon Quartet Fifth in a series of six concerts 
from the WBAI studio. The quartet features Don 
Moore on bass; Howard McRae on drums; Bill 
Dixon, trumpet; and Archie Shepp, tenor sax. 

10:30 DANNIE ABSE, POET OF GOLDERS GREEN 

Dannie Abse, British poet whose latest published 
work is Poems, Golders Green, reads and talks 

AdT't 



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Experienced, professional staff. All sports, science, 
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children, Ages 6 to 14. Special Training Program 
for a limited and selected group of High School 
students. Four or eight week periods. 

Phone for appointment 

Sara Abramson, Director 

853 B'way, N.Y.C. 3. AL 4-2526 

Member American Camping Ass'n. 




about his work. Three of the poems are heard on 
Pacifica for the first time, having never been pub- 
lished or performed before. The program was 
recorded in London at the BBC by Mike Tigar, 
and is one of a series which Pacifica is presenting 
on young British poets. Feb. 8 

11:00 SOUNDS OUR FATHERS HEARD Byron 
Bryant with The Egyptian Movement in American 
Popular Music. 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 



12:00 RADIO. 



-Along with it, Phil 



Elwood's JAZZ REVIEW, 
4:00 SIGN-OFF 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 

8:00 RUBINSTEIN PLAYS BEETHOVEN* The 

"Moonlight." "Les Adieux" and "Pathetique" 
Sonatas; details. Feb. 7, 5:45 p.m. 



9:00 BARTOK'S CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA* 

Krkh Lcinsdorfs first Boston Symphony record- 
ing (RCA 2643). Feb. 16 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Herbert Apthcker. Feb. 7 

10:15 CONTEMPORARY Ml'SIC IN EVOLUTION 

Ciiinlher Schuller. Feb. 5 

11:15 YOl'NC GERMANY Aryeh Leissner comments 
on a recent history of the German youth move- 
ments; details on Feb. 10 

11:45 GOLDEN VOICES Anthony Boucher. Feb. 5 

12:15 THIS ISLAND NOW The third Reith Lecture 
by ti. M. Carstairs. Feb. 7 

12:45 NEW RECORDINGS Feb. 15 

•SCHUMANN Symphony No. 4 in d. Op. 120 

(Cleve Orch/E/ell) (Epic 3854) 25m 
•MOZART Violin Concerto No. 4 in D, K. 218 

Heifetz, New Svmph of London/Sargent) (RCA 

2652) 21m 
•BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 8 in F, Op. 93 

(Cleve Orch/Szell) (Epic 3854) 27m 

2:00 THE ISTANBLL EXPRESS Another adventure 
from the wonderful world of movieland, a timeless 
tale of intrigue, mystery, adventure, death and the 
rampaging ubermensch. Written by Jim Armstrong 
and produced for Pacifica Radio by Mr. Arm- 
strong and John 'Squidge' Whiting. (Archives) 

2:45 DANNIE ABSE, POET OF GOLDERS GREEN 

Feb. 7 

3:15 SPOLETO FESTIVAL. 1962 — IX Works by 
Schubert. Brahms and Mozart. Feb. 7 

4:15 MY WORD! The BBC panel game. 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 BACH AND HANDEL ARIAS sung by Ernst 
Haefliger with the Munich Bach Orchestra and 
Solistengemeinschaft of the Ansbach Bach Festi- 
val under Karl Richter; from DGG 19 268. Feb. 10 
•HANDEL From "Xerses": Recitative, "Frondi 
tenere"; Larghetto, "Ombra mai fu"; Aria, *'Se 
bramate d'amar, chi vi sdegna." From "Giulio 
Cesare": Aria, "Svegliatevi nel core." From 
"Samson"; Cavata, "Total eclipse!". Aria, 
"Thus when the sun from 's wat'ry bed." 
•BACH Recitativo, "Der Hoechste laesst mich 
seinen Willin wissen" and Aria, "Weiss ich 
Gottes Rechte" from the Cantata "Es ist dir 
gesagt, Mensch, was gut ist"; the Benedictus 
from the Mass in b; the Deposuit from the 
Magnificat; Recitativo, "Mein Jesus schweight 
zu falschen Luegen stille" and Aria, "Geduld, 
Geduld"; Aria, "Meine Seele ruehmt and 
preist" from the Cantata of the same name. 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION John McDennott, member of th'e 
Councils of Correspondence (Series). Feb. 11 

7:15 PENDENNIS 'The Pleasure Garden', part Five 
on the BBC serial. 

7:45 MODERN JAZZ SCENE Phil Elwood with 
Miles Davis, Part Two. 

8:15 TOKAY TAVERN A documentary on the 
misery of skid row — personal narratives re- 
corded on the streets of San Francisco, Stockton 
and Los Angeles — with appropriate musical in- 
terludes. Produced by Saul Landau, a member of 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 7 



the faculty at Emerson College, and Ernst Lowe 
of KPFA. Feb. 7 

9:00 MUSIC FORUM Ren6 Leibowitz, the French 
composer and conductor, was one of the first 
twelve-tone composers ouside the immediate circle 
of Schoenberg and his influence. He talks with 
Eric Salzman about his approach to the problems 
of serial composition in a fast-changing world in 
which he was first regarded as a wild-eyed radical 
prophet of the future and then, in the space of 
only a few years, as an old-fashioned conserva- 
tive. The program includes some of his music and 
some examples of his conducting. Feb. 10 

10:30 SPOLETO FESTIVAL 1962 — X Feb. 11 
SCHUBERT Four Impromptus, Op. 90 

(Marcella Crudeli, piano) 
FRANCK. Sonata in A for violin and piano 

(Henry Aubert, John Browning) 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 
11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 
12:00 RADIO _^_ 



Also — Nightsounds. 
4:00 SIGN-OFF 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 

8:00 THE MAHLER SIXTH the Viennese com- 
poser's Sixth Symphony is performed by the BBC 
Symphony under Berthold Goldschmidt. The 
work, which is heard here on a BBC transcription, 
is introduced by Deryck Cooke. Feb. 3 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

10:30 BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE EUyn Beaty 
reviews recent books on the outdoors. 

10:45 WHAT BOOKS FOR YOUR CHILD? A talk 
with Josette Frank, Director, Children's Books 
and Mass Media for the Child Study Association 
of America. A member of the Book Selection 
Committee of the National Conference of Chris- 
tians and Jews, Mrs. Frank has written widely on 
children's reading and television viewing. Her 
recent publications include Your Child's Reading 
Today, Children and TV and Poems to Read to 
the Very Young. 



OM. 




Page 8 



WBAI Program Folio 



11:15 TWO GUITAR RECITAL performed by Ida 
Presti and Alexandre Lagoya at the camp of the 
Jeunesses Musicales du Canada at Mount Orford, 
Quebec, and recorded by the CBC. Feb. 11 
LAUFFENSTEINER Sonata in A 
DANIEL LESUR Elegie 
VIVALDI Concerto in D 

11:45 THE BURMESE NECKLACE A valuable ruby 
necklace has been stolen, but by whom, and from 
whom? One detective has already been killed — 
what are Mr. Slade's chances? (BBC) 

12:45 MISCELLANY 

1:00 THE THEATRE OF lONESCO: The Retreat 

The last in a series of lectures entitled "The Theatre 
in a Collective Society' by Robert W. Corrigan, 
head of the Department of Drama at Carnegie 
Institute of Technology. 

2:00 JAZZ Les Davis 

4:30 REPORT ON MEDICINE Alden Whitman. 
Feb. 15 

5:00 THE LAST MIIVUTE Reserved for programs 
which arrive too late for listing in the Folio. 

6:00 EDINBURGH FESTIVAL 1962 — X The PhU- 
harmonic Orchestra under Gennadi Rozhdest- 
vensky, with David Oistrakh, violin. Feb. 11 
SHOSTAKOVICH Concerto for Violin and Or- 
chestra, Op. 99; Symphony No. 4, Op. 43 

7:45 PHENOMENOLOGY William Earle, Profes- 
sor of Philosophy at Northwestern University and 
author of Objectivity (Noonday) discusses Ed- 
mund Husserl (1859-1938). Professor Earle and 
Cecil Hemley, novelist, editor and critic, examine 
the views of the German epistemologist and their 
development in contemporary philosophy. Feb. 5 

8:30 SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL The Tennent Pro- 
duction Company version of the play by Richard 
Brinsley Sheridan, directed by John Gielgud. The 
cast features Ralph Richardson, John Gielgud, 
Geraldine McEwan and Gwen Ffrangcon-Davies. 
This play ranks among the most brilliant successes 
in English theatrical literature. Though it lacks 
the poetic genius of Shakespeare, the nonsensical 
fantasy of Oscar Wilde, and the scholarly classical 
richness of Congreve, it reflects exactly the par- 
ticular kind of society and manners in the London 
of the 1770's when it was written. The plot is 
founded on malice, simple wit and good nature 

— and reflects the morality and sentimentality of 
the time. Both Lady Teazle and Charles Surface 
are charming and reckless lighthearted characters 

— both are victims of their own rashness and both, 
by the time the play is over, promise to reform. 
(Command Records) 

10:45 THE BARE FEET OF TEOTITIAN Photogra- 
pher Nell Dorr reminisces about her conception 
of one of the few remaining primitive societies in 
the world. She is the author of Tlie Bare Feet 

(N.Y. Graphic Society). Feb. 15 

11:00 TIGHT LIKE THAT Joe Boyd with music from 
the race records of the 1920's, '30's and '40's; 
blues, jazz, boogie and gospel from Chicago, 
Memphis and the South. 



some highlights In 



mufic 



ISRAEL FESTIVAL, 1962 

7:45 p.m., Feb. 4; 9:30 p.m., Feb. 6 



SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 

Evenings: Feb. 5, 7, 8, 11, 12 and 13 

RENE LEIBOWITZ 

9:00 p.m., Feb. 8 

Castiglioni's 'ATTRAVERSO LO SPECCHIO' 

3:00 p.m., Feb. 10 

Schoenberg's 'ERWARTUNG' and 
'DIE GLEUCKLICHE HAND' 

3:45 p.m., Feb. 10 

Haydn's MISSA SANCTAE CAECILLAE 

5:00 p.m., Feb. 10 

AMERICAN BRASS QUINTET 

8:45 p.m., Feb. 10 

FOLK SONG FROM BRITAIN 

10:00 p.m., Feb. 13 

MUSIC OF LUIGI NONO 

8:45 p.m., Feb. 15 

Puccini's 'LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST' 

2:15 p.m., Feb. 17 



12:00 RADIO_ 



.(You name it). To 



be heard: Bill Faier's MIDNIGHT SPECIAL. 
4:00 SIGN-OFF 



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 

8:00 LUTE SONGS OF THOMAS CAMPION by 

Rene Soames, tenor, with Walter Gerwing, lute, 
and Johannes Koch, viola da gamba; from Ar- 
chive 3004. Feb. 5 

My sweetest Lesbia; Though you are young; I 
care not for these ladies; Follow thy fair son; My 
love hath vowed; When to her lute Corinna sings; 
Turn back, you wanton flyer; It fell on a summer's 
day; Follow your saint. 

8:30 BACH AND HANDEL ARIAS *Ernst Haefli- 
ger sings Handel operatic arias and similar ex- 



cerpts from Bach sacred works. The Munich Bach 
Orchestra and the Solistengemeinschaft of the 
Ansbach Bach Festival is under Karl Richter. Full 
program details are listed on Feb. 8 at 5:45 p.m. 

9:30 MAN ON EARTH S. P. R. Charters explora- 
tions into the ecology of man. 

10:00 MUSIC FORUM Eric SaUman talks with French 
composer-conductor Ren6 Leibowitz. Feb. 8 

11:30 LAURENTIAN BACH FESTIVAL. 1962 Bach 
program performed at Lake Macdonald, Quebec, 
by Mildred Goodman, violinist, John Newmark, 
pianist, and Mario Deschenes, flutist. Feb. 14 
Sonata in G for violin and keyboard; French Suite 
No. 6; from The Musical Offerings: Fuga canoni- 
ca; Canon perpetuus; Trio Sonata 

12:30 THE CONSERVATIVE INTELLECTUAL 

Mike Tigar interviews Lord Windlesham, Chair- 
man of the Bow Group, an organization of young 
British conservatives devoted to research of cur- 
rent political problems. The program takes up or- 
ganization, current young conservative philosophy, 
and the public disfavor recently bestowed upon 
Prime Minister MacMillan's government. 

1:05 MISCELLANY 

1:15 THE GRASSHOPPER Chekhov's story adapted 
and translated as a play for radio. Produced for 
the BBC by H. B. Fortuin. 

2:15 MAKING RISKY DECISIONS A talk by Pro- 
fessor Ward Edwards of the University of Michi- 
gan. Feb. 7 

2:30 THE ANTI-RECESSIONARY TAX CUT Two 

differing views on the function of tax cuts are 
presented with one rebuttal each by Jack Schwartz, 
mathematician and economist at N.Y.U. and 
Eugene Lemer, Professor of Economics at N.Y.U. 

3:00 ATTRAVERSO LO SPECCHIO, a one-act 
opera by the young Italian composer Nicolo Cas- 
tigUoni with a libretto by Alberto Ca' Zorzi No- 
venta derived (rather vaguely) from Lewis Carroll. 
This Italian radio performance is by the or- 
chestra and chorus of the Turin RAI under Carlo 
Franci with the following cast: Feb. 6 

Alice (sung portions) Catherine Gayer 

Alice (spoken portions) Ivana Erbetta 

Ariel Catherine Gayer 

Puck Adrianna Martino 

Echo Giovanna Fioroni 

Oberon (sung portions) Giovanni Ciminelli 

Oberon (spoken portions) Alberto Pozzo 

First Speaker Elvio Ronza 

Second Speaker Anna Caravaggi 

3:45 TWO SCHOENBERG OPERAS: *Die Glueck- 
liche Hand and Erwartung. Two major twentieth- 
century works in new recordings, part of Colum- 
bia's Music of Arnold Schoenberg series (Vol. 1; 
M2L 279). "Die GlueckJiche Hand" is here re- 
corded for the first time with Robert Oliver, bass, 
and a studio orchestra and chorus. "Erwartung" 
is sung by Helga Pilarczyk with the Washington 
Opera Society Orchestra. Both performances are 
under the direction of Robert Craft. Feb. 6 

4:30 THE FILM ART Frank Capra, Hollywood's 
original comedy director, talks to Gideon Bach- 
mann at Karlovy Vary, Czechoslovakia, where 
for the first time this year the United States par- 
ticipated officially in the Eastern World's most 
important film festival. Capra was the oflScial U.S. 
delegate. 

5:00 HAYDN'S MISSA SANCTAE CAECILIAE 

performed by Maria Stader, soprano; Marga Hoeflf- 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 9 



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Page 10 



WBAI Program Folio 



gen, mezzo-soprano; Richard Holm, tenor; and Jo- 
seph Greindl, bass, with the Symphony Orchestra 
and Chorus of the Turin radio under Eugen Jo- 
chum (RAl tapes). Feb. 11 

6:15 OTHER KNOWLEDGE Novelist and poet Le- 
nore Marshall reads from her latest book of poems 
(Noonday Press) and some newer poetry published 
in various magazines. Feb. 7 

6:45 MUSIC FOR CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Feb. 5 
•GEORGE BARATI Chamber Concerto 

(members, Phila Orch/Ormandy) (Col 6379) 22m 
LAWRENCE MOSS Scenes for Small Orchestra 
(orch/Meier) (tape) 8m 

7:20 MISCELLANY 

7:30 SING ME A SONG OF SOCIAL SIGNIFI- 
CANCE John Ohliger with songs about Adolf 
Hitler. Feb. 11 
7:45 CDLTLIRE FOR THE SUB-CITIES A rebroad- 
cast of our interview with architect Albert Mayer 
on his plan to decentralize culture in the great 
metropoli. In this second broadcast, Mr. Mayer 
amplifies on some of the institutions he would 
like to help create, such as the sub-city museum 
and the sub-city center, and he discusses the ul- 
timate social and human utility of his views on 
planning. Feb. 1 1 
8:45 AMERICAN BRASS QUINTET this concert, 
originally given at Carnegie Recital Hall, is be- 
ing specially broadcast on WBAI at this time. The 
members of the American Brass Quintet are 
Ronald K. Anderson and Robert W. Heinrich, 
trumpets, Arnold Fromme and Gilbert Cohen, 
trombones, and Daniel E. Cowan, French horn. 
Feb. 15 
MICHAEL EAST Desperavi, Fancy for Five 

Instruments 
ULYSSES KAY Brass Quartet 
ANTHONY HOLBORNE Dances 
J. S. BACH Contrapunctus No. 3 from "The Art 

of the Fugue" 
CHARLES WHITTENBERG Triptych for Brass 

Quintet (premiere) 
HEINRICH ISAAC "Der Hund" (performed on 

Comette, Alto and Bass Sackbuts) 
ELIAS TANENBAUM Structures for Brass 

Quintet 

10:00 YOUNG GERMANY Aryeh Leissner, a fre- 
quent WBAI program contributor, here comments 
on Walter Z. Laquer's history of the German 
Youth Movements (Basic Books) and the rela- 
tionship of these movements to our present day 
'youth culture'. Feb. 8 

10:30 THE BLACK GIRL IN SEARCH OF GOD 

George Bernard Shaw's preface to his play, read 
with suitable high accent by Bernard Mayes. 
Feb. 5 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ Martin Williams with 
the Greatest Louis Armstrong. 

12:00 SIGN-OFF 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

8:00 TWO GUITAR RECITAL Ida Presti and Alex- 
andre Lagoya recorded in Canada by the CBC; 
details. Feb. 9, 11:15 a.m. 

8:30 HAYDN'S MISSA SANCTAE CAECILIAE in 

an Italian radio performance directed by Eugen 
Jochum with Maria Stader, soprano; Marga Hoeff- 



gen. mezzo-soprano; Richard Holm, tenor, and 
Joseph Greindl, bass, and the Symphony Orchestra 
and Chorus of the Turin radio. Feb. 10 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION John McDermott. Feb. 8 

10:15 SING ME A SONG OF SOCIAL SIGNIFI- 
CANCE Feb. 10 

10:30 CILTURE FOR THE SUB-CITIES An inter- 
view with architect Albert Mayer. Feb. 10 

11:00 Wall Whitman's A SONG OF MYSELF Read 
for the BBC by Orson Welles, 'A Song of Myself 
was written in 1855 when Whitman was 36, and 
was published in the same year as an untitled in- 
troduction to the first edition of Leaves of Grass. 

12:00 THE WORLD OF MUSICAL COMEDY Stan- 
ley Green. Feb. 6 

1:00 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — X Works by 
Schubert and Franck. Feb. 8 

2:00 RUSSIA TODAY AND THE WORLD REVO- 
LUTION AGAINST FEUDALISM The Honor- 
able William O. Douglas, Supreme Court Justice 
of the United States, speaking at the Ford Hall 
Forum in Boston. Recorded for Pacifica by 
WHRB. Feb. 17 

3:00 EDINBURGH FESTIVAL, 1962 — X The Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra, with David Oistrakh, violin 
Feb. 9 

SHOSTAKOVICH Concerto for Violin and Or- 
chestra, Op. 99; Symphony No. 4, Op. 43 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 CHAMBER CONCERT the performers are 
Dennis Brain, horn; Leonard Brain, oboe; Ste- 
phen Waters, clarinet; Cecil James, bassoon; 
Colin Horsley, piano, and Manoug Parikian, 
violin; from Capital 7175. Feb. 4 
LENNOX BERKELEY Trio for Violin, Horn and 

Piano, Op. 44 
MOZART Quintet in E[j, K. 452, for Piano and 

Winds 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION Herman Benson, Editor Union De- 
mocracy in Action (Series). Feb. 12 

7:15 PENDENNIS Continuing with the BBC seriali- 
zation of Thackeray's novel. Tonight, Part Six: 
'Wings of Pegasus'. 

7:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL 1962 — XI Feb. 12 

RAVEL Sonatine; Ma Mere I'oye, five pieces for 
piano, four hands (John Browning, Charles 
Wadsworth) 
MOZART String Quartet, K. 465 
(Lenox Quartet) 

8:45 A CONVERSATION WITH MAURICE HIN- 
DUS The veteran journalist and traveller, author 
of fourteen books on the Soviet Union, talks with 
Dick Elman about his latest book. House Without 
a Roof (Doubleday). Feb. 12 

9:30 REPORT ON MUSIC Salzman on orchestras 
(continued). This discussion wUl take up do- 
mestic developments including the new Leins- 
dorf look in Boston. Feb. 14 

11:00 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES Henry 
Cowell. Feb. 17 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 SIGN-OFF 



TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

8:00 BAROOl'E MUSIC from Library of Recorded 
Miisterpiccfs sets with the late Max Cioberman, 
Michael Iree, Sonya Monosoff and Fred Man- 
zella. violinists, Hugcnia Harle and Stoddard Lin- 
coln, harpsichordists; Jean Schnaider and Sterling 
Hunkins, cellists, and Joseph ladone, lutenist. 
Feb. 14 

CORELLI Sonata in G, Op. 4, No. 10 
VIVALDI Sonata in G 
CORELLI Sonata in e. Op. 5. No. 8 
VIVALDI Trio in g for violin, lute and bass 
CORELLI Sonata in D. Op. 4, No. 4 

8:45 THE MAHLER FIRST* The composer's Sym- 
phony No. 1 in D, sometimes called "The Titan." 
It is directed by Bruno Walter in one of the con- 
ductor's last recordings, issued posthumously. 
Feb. 13 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Herman Benson. Feb. 11 

10:15 JANACEK'S SLAVONIC MASS The Czech 
composer's Msa Glagolskaja, sometimes also called 
the Glagolitic Mass in reference to the ancient 
Slavonic liturgical language of the text. The per- 
formance is by the Moravian Mixed Chorus and 
Brno Radio Symphony Orchestra under Brestislav 
Bakala; from Urania 7072. Feb. 14 

11:00 A CONVERSATION WITH MAURICE HIN- 
DUS Feb. 11 

11:45 DR. JOHNSON ON MARRIAGE Opinions of 
the 18th Century sage from James Boswell's biog- 
raphy. The BBC presents James McKechnie as 
Boswell. 

12:00 HANDEL'S L'ALLEGRO ED ILPENSEROSO 

Milton Handelized and performed by Adele Ad- 
dison, soprano; John McCollum, tenor; John Rear- 
don, baritone; Albert Fuller, harpsichord, and 
an orchestra and chorus directed by Frederic 
Waldman (Decca DXA-165). Feb. 16 

1:30 DR. JOHNSON ON MONEY Another reading 
from Boswell's biography (BBC) 

1:45 WARSAW AUTU.MN 1962 — I The Symphony 
No. 3, Op. 27 and the Symphony No. 4, Symphony 
Concertante, Op. 60, of Karol Szymanowski. Per- 
formance details on Feb. 17, 7 p.m 

2:45 HENRY DAVID THOREAU A biographical 
appreciation of the author, presented in the hun- 
dredth year after his death. Written and produced 
by David Ossman with Ross Martin as the voice 
of Thoreau. Dec. 30 

3:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — XI Music by 
Ravel and Mozart. Feb. 11 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 JAZZ ARCHIVES Phil Elwood 

6:15 GOLDEN VOICES In the first of three pro- 
grams on the pre-war recordings of the late Kir- 
sten Flagstad (1895-1962), Anthony Boucher pre- 
sents her in arias from Die Walkuere and Lohen- 
grin and the Tristan love duet with Lauritz Mel- 
chior. Feb. 15 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION Conrad J. Lynn, attorney. Feb. 13 

7:15 A CONVERSATION WITH JULIO ALVA- 
REZ DEL VAYO The Foreign Minister in the 
last Loyalist Government of Spain who now 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 1 1 



heads one of the many vocal but small exile 
groups opposed to the Franco Government, is 
challenged on his interpretations of the past, 
present and future of his country in an interview 
with WBAI volunlecr Gene McCiarr. Feb. 13 

8:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION 

(iunlher Schuller. Feb. 15 

9:00 THIS ISLAND NOW The fourth Reith Lecture 
by Ci. M. Carstairs, this one entitled 'The New 
Role of Women". Feb. 13 

9:30 TENNYSON AND LINCOLNSHIRE England's 
second largest county. Lincolnshire, is one of the 
least explored, but it is thoroughly familiar to John 
Betjeman, poet, critic, connoisseur of Victoriana, 
and tireless topographer. The Lincolnshire coun- 
tryside was the boyhood home of Alfred, Lord 
Tennyson, and Betjeman illustrates the relation- 
ship of that countryside to Tennyson's verse. 
(BBC) 

9:45 AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC Bill Faier and 
Barry Komfeld present Negro Folk Guitar — with 
musical examples. Feb. 4 

10:45 SPOLETO FESTIVAL 1962 — XII Feb. 13 
BRAHMS Piano Quintet in f. Op. 34 
(Browning, Lenox Qt) 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 RADIO 



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4:00 SIGN-OFF 



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RECORDS 

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Page 1 2 



WBAI Program Folio 



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 

8:00 VALENTINE'S DAY MUSIC a day in ad- 
vance. Faure, Franck, Roussel (details, Feb. 14, 
3:30 p.m.) followed by De Falla's "El amor brujo" 
and Mozart's "Lo sposo deluso" (details, Feb. 14, 
5:45 p.m). 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION Conrad J. Lymi. Feb. 12 

10:15 PUCCINI'S LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST in 

an Italian radio performance with Renata Tebaldi, 
Daniele Barioni, Giangiacomo Guelfi and others. 
Details, Feb. 17, 2:15 p.m. 

12:30 THIS ISLAND NOW The New Role of Wom- 
en', the fourth Reith Lecture by G. M. Carstairs. 
Feb. 12 

1:00 HENRY THE NAVIGATOR A BBC talk by 
Ernie Bradford about the grandson of 'old John 
of Gaunt, time-honored Lancaster', and son of the 
King of Portugal, Prince Henry of Portugal — 
known best as "Henry the Navigator'. It was he 
who first sent ships out into the Atlantic beyond 
the places where men believed, at that time, that 
the waters of the ocean poured over the edge of 
the earth, carrying with them any ships foolhardy 
enough to sail there. 

1:15 A CONVERSATION WITH JULIO ALVAREZ 
DEL VAYO Feb. 12 

2:00 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — XII Feb. 12 
BRAHMS Piano Quintet in f. Op. 34 (Browning, 
Lenon Qt.) 

2:45 RICHARD II The BBC World Theatre produc- 
tion of Shakespeare's play with John Gielgud and 
Ralph Richardson. Details on Saturday, Feb. 16 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 THE MAHLER FIRST* The composer's Sym- 
phony No. 1 in D, sometimes called "The Titan." 
It is directed by Bruno Walter in one of the con- 
ductor's last recordings, issued posthumously. 
Feb. 12 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION To be announced. 

7:15 PENDENNIS Part Seven: 'Fame and FoUy". 

7:45 CHILDBIRTH WITHOUT PAIN An interview 
in London by Mike Tigar, just 14'/2 hours after 
Mrs. Tigar had given birth to a seven-pound son 
using the method of natural childbirth described 
in the program. The interviewee is Mrs. Erna 
Wright, who conducts prenatal training classes 
for mothers who intend lo use the psychoprophy- 
lactic method of painless and drugless childbirth. 
Mrs. Wright also talks of the work of the National 
Childbirth Trust, a British organization formed to 
foster the spread of these notions of childbirth. 
Mike Tigar sounds a bit addled, but he will have 
to be excused. (The baby's name is Jon Steven 
Tigar). Feb. 14 

8:15 FIVE MONTHS IN KATANGA Kebroadcast 
from our Last Minute, this interview with Albert 
Featherstone, who went lo Katanga to make a 
pro-Tshombe movie for a 'right-wing' Santa 
Monica group and then defected, gives intimate 
glimpses of the political and domestic life in the 



dominions of the Union Mini^re. The interviewer 
is Dick Elman. Feb. 6 

8:55 MISCELLANY 

9:00 THIS ISLAND NOW The fifth Reith Lecture 
by G. M. Carstairs, 'Living and Partly Living'. 
Feb. 14 

9:30 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — XIII Feb. 14 
CHOPIN Variations Brillianles 

(Marcella Crudeli) 
BELLINI Four songs for tenor and piano: "II 
fervido desiderio," "Malinconia, ninfa gentile," 
"Vanne, o rosa fortunata," "Per pieta, bell'idol 
mio" 

(Pietro Bottazzo, tenor. Charles Wadsworth, 
piano) 

10:00 FOLK SONG FROM ALL OVER Ewan 
MacCoU, Peggy Seeger, Enoch Kent, Bert Lloyd 
and others sing songs of work, drinking, political 
satire and love. The program was recorded at the 
Singer's Club in London. The Singer's Club is one 
of a large number of folk song clubs in England, 
Scotland and Wales, devoted to the study and 
singing of folk song. The singers, besides being 
Britain's most eminent collectors and performers 
of folk song, know the history of the songs they 
sing and provide a running commentary. Feb. 17 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 RADIO 

4:00 SIGN-OFF 



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 

8:00 LAURENTIAN BACH FESTIVAL, 1962 Bach 
from the CBC; performed by Mildred Goodman, 
violin, John Newmark, piano, and Mario Du- 
schenes, flute. Details, Feb. 10, 11:30 a.m. 

9:00 BARTOK'S DIVERTIMENTO FOR STRINGS* 

performed by the Moscow Chamber Orchestra 
under Rudolf Barshai on a new London recording 
(6332). Feb. 16 

9:45 NEWS 

9:50 MISCELLANY 

10:00 OPINION To be announced. 

10:15 REPORT ON MUSIC Eric Salzman. Feb. 11 

11:45 THIS ISLAND NOW The fifth Reith Lecture. 
Feb. 13 

12:15 SPOLETO FESTIVAL, 1962 — Xin Works by 
Chopin and Bellini. Feb. 13 

12:45 CHILDBIRTH WITHOUT PAIN Feb. 13 

1:15 BAROQUE MUSIC Chamber works by Vivaldi 
and Corelli; details, Feb. 12, 8 a.m. 

2:00 WEATHER FOR MURDER A BBC thrUler by 
Philip Levene. 

3:00 JEREMY ROBSON The British poet reads a 
selection of his poetry. Feb. 17 

3:30 VALENTINE'S DAY MUSIC Feb. 13 

FAURE Pelleas et M^lisande 

(Paris Opera-Comique Orch/Tzipine) (Ang 

35311) 15m 
FRANCK Psyche et Eros 

(NBC Symph/Toscanini) (RCA 1838) 9m 
ROUSSEL Bacchus et Ariane, Suite No. 2 

(Phila Orch/Ormandy) (Col 5667) 16m 



4:15 HISPANIC-AMERICAN REPORT Prepared for 
Pacifica by Ronald Hilton of Stanford llniversity's 
Hispanic-American and I.uzo-Brazilian Institute. 
Feb. 17 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 VALENTINES DAY MUSIC (CON.) Feb. 13 
OF FALLA tl amor brujo 

(Verrct, Phila Orch/Stokowski) (Col 5479) 27m 
MOZART Lo sposo deluso 

(soloists, Milan radio/Pradella) (RAI tape) 26m 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION David T. Bazelon, author, The Paper 
Economy (Random House). Feb. IS 

7:15 PENDENNIS Part Nine of the BBC serializa- 
tion — 'A Blessing in Disguise'. 

7:45 JAZZ WITH A. B. SPELLMAN 

8:45 FALLACY AND FACT Santha Rama Rau, the 
Indian novelist, believes that it is only when people 
begin to travel that they realize how much their 
ideas of foreign countries are based on myth and 
legend. In this short talk she attempts lightheart- 
edly to dispel some of our favorite illusions . . . 
she shows that the Inscrutable Oriental is as much 
a misconceived generalization as the Englishman 
who dresses for dinner in the jungle. (BBC) 

9:00 THIS ISLAND NOW The concluding Reith 
Lecture by Professor CM. Carstairs, psychiatrist 
and anthropologist. The title of this one is 'Unde- 
veloped Potentials in Personality'. Feb. 15 

9:30 JANACEK'S SLAVONIC MASS The Czech 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 1 3 



composer's Msa glagolskaja sometimes also called 
the Glagolitic Mass in reference to the ancient 
Slavonic liturgical language of the text. The per- 
formance is by the Moravian Mixed Chorus and 
Brno Radio Symphony Orchestra under Bresti- 
slay Bakala; from Urania 7072. Feb. 12 

10:15 STARFISH — A TEST OF SCIENTIFIC IN- 
TEGRITY Dr. James Van Allen, of Iowa State 
University talks at the 129th annual meeting of 
the American Association for the Advancement 
of Science held recently in Philadelphia. He re- 
ports on the scientific consequences of large-scale 
experimentation in space. Feb. 15 

10:45 POEMS FROM THE WEST INDIES John 
Figueroa has selected the poems, including some 
from Derek Walcott's In a Green Night (Cape) 
and his own volume Love Leaps Here (Cross Cur- 
rents). Figueroa, poet and critic, is a professor at 
the University of the West Indies in Kingston, 
Jamaica. Feb. 15 

11:20 MAN, MITES AND MEDICINE A talk by Dr. 
John Harrison, zoologist at the Queensland Insti- 
tute of Medical Research in Brisbane, Australia. 
(BBC) 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 

12:00 RADIO Mr. Pass will also 

play another JAZZ REVIEW. 

4:00 SIGN-OFF 



Adv't 



AMERICAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Leopold STOKOWSKY, 

Music Director 



3 MONDAY EVENINGS at 8.40 P.M. — CARNEGIE HALL 

FEB. 25 — MAR. 11 — APR. 15 

Programs include works of: 

BACH (St. Matthew Passion) — BEETHOVEN — BRAHMS 
CRESTON — GINASTERA — MOZART — RIMSKY-KORSAKOV — WAGNER 

SUBSCRIPTION TICKET PRICES FOR 3 CONCERTS: $15, $12, $10, $7.50, $4 
Please make checks payable to Carnegie Hall Box Office with self-addressed and stamped envelope. 



Page 14 



WBAI Program Folio 



some highlights in 



literature 



an 



d A 



rama 



THE STREETS ON POMPEII (BBC) 

1 :30 p.m., Feb. 4 

Thackeray's PENDENNIS 

Weeknights at 7:15 p.m. 

SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL 

8:30 p.m., Feb. 9 

Chekhov's THE GRASSHOPPER 

1:15 p.m., Feb. 10 

POETRY: LENORE MARSHALL 

6:15 p.m., Feb. 10 

WEST INDIAN POETRY 

10:45 p.m., Feb. !4 

S. I. HAYAKAWA 

9:30 p.m., Feb. 15 

THE BIG HEWER (BBC) 

11 :15 p.m., Feb. 16 

Shakespeare's RICHARD II (BBC) 

8:45 p.m., Feb. 16 

POETRY: JEREMY ROBSON 

6:30 p.m., Feb. 17 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 

8:00 NEW RECORDS of the Schumann Fourth* 
(Szell), the Mozart Violin Concerto No. 4* 
(Heifetz) and the Beethoven Eighth* (Szell). De- 
tails on Feb. 8, 12:45 p.m. 

9:15 SCHOENBERG'S VIOLIN CONCERTO* per- 
formed by Israel Baker with the CBC Symphony 
under Robert Craft; details. Feb. 17. 5:15 p.m. 



9:45 NEWS 
9:50 MISCELLANY 
10:00 OPINION David T. Bazelon. Feb. 14 

10:15 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLLITION 

Ciunther Schuller. Feb. 12 

11:15 REPORT ON MEDICINE Alden Whitman. 
Feb. 9 

11:45 GOLDEN VOICES Anthony Boucher. Feb. 12 

12:15 THIS ISLAND NOW The last of the 1962 BBC 
Reith Lectures by Professor (j. M. Carstairs. 
Feb. 14 

12:45 AMERICAN BRASS QUINTET A program 
e.specially recorded for WBAI. This New York 
ensemble performs contemporary works by Ulysses 
Kay, Charles Whillcnberg and Elias Tanenbaum 
as well as older music by Michael East, Anthony 
Holborne, Bach and Isaac. More details on Feb. 
10, 5 p.m. 

2:00 STARFISH — A TEST OF SCIENTIFIC IN- 
TEGRITY A talk by Dr. James Van Allen, de- 
livered at the AAAS meeting in Philadelphia. 
Feb. 14 

2:30 THE TOWER OF TALLFANG Another pro- 
gram from the wonderful world of movieland, 
produced at KPFA. (Archives) 

3:15 THE BARE FEET OF TEOTITLAN Nell Dorr. 
Feb. 9 

3:30 POEMS OF THE WEST INDIES John Fi- 
gueroa. Feb. 14 

4:05 MISCELLANY 

4:15 MY WORD! The BBC panel game. 

4:45 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

5:45 THE BRUCKNER THIRD Bruckner liked to 
call his Symphony No. 3 in d, his "Wagner 
Symphony." The performance here is by Hans 
Knappertsbusch and the Vienna Philharmonic on 
London 1044. 

6:45 NEWS 

7:00 OPINION John McDermott, member, Councils 
of Correspondence (Series). Feb. 18 

7:15 PENDENNIS The Upper Hand', Part Ten of 
the BBC serialization of the book by William 
Makepeace Thackeray. The series will be con- 
cluded next week. 

7:45 THE MODERN JAZZ SCENE Phil Elwood 
with recordings by Miles Davis. 

8:15 SURVIVAL A bi-weekly report on the activities 
and issues of the peace movement in the United 
Stales and abroad. The programs are produced 
and presented by WBAI volunteer Mortimer 
Frankel, a veteran worker in the peace movement. 
Feb. 17 

8:45 MUSIC OF LUIGl NONO on Itaian radio 
tapes. Feb. 17 
Due Espressioni per Orchestra 

(Rome Radio Orch/Maderna) 10m 
F.spana en el Coraz6n, Three Studies for soprano, 

baritone, small chorus and percussion (soloists, 

Rome Radio Orch & Chorus/Maderna) 11m 
Omaggio a Emilio Vedova 

(electronic tape) 5m 
Cori di Didone 

(Cologne Radio Orch & Chorus/Zinnermann) 

9:30 THE DIME IN THE JUKE BOX Semanticist 
S. I. Hayakawa discusses the concept of 'Inten- 



The following editorial appeared in the New York Times West Coast 
edition; it would have appeared in the New York City edition on Satur- 
day, January 12. The editorial is reprinted with the permission of the 
New York Times, 




TUF NFW \nnK TIMHS WKS IFRN I^Dll ION 
MONDAY', JANUARY 14, 1963. 

Adolph's. Ochs, Publisher 1896-1935 

PLBUSHED EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES COMPANY 



Arthur Hays Sulzberger Chairman of the Board 
Orvil E. Dryfoos President and Publisher 
ORY H. Bradford, Vice President Harding F. Bancroft, Secretary 

Francis A. Cox, Treasurer 



How to Harass Radio Station 



The Senate Internal Security Subcom- 
mittee appears to be bent on harassment 
in its investigation of the Pacifica Foun- 
dation, the non-profit organization thai 
relies on audience contributions to operate 
radio stations WBAI in New York ; KPFA 
in San Francisco and KPFK in Los An- 
geles. 

In opening the inquiry on Thursday 
Senator Thomas J. Dodd of Connecticut 
said that the subcommittee was not in- 
terested in knowing whether the program- 
ing of radio stations actually had come 
under Communist influence. Rather, he 
said, it would try to find out whether 
there had been "infiltration" which made 
such influence "possible." Under this 
bizarre criterion, the subcommittee is evi- 
dently asserting the right to inquire into 
the background and beliefs of everyone 
working for an organ of public opinion. In 
such an atmosphere the obvious conse- 
quence would be an environment in which 
many individuals might hesitate to speak 
their thoughts. Anticipatory censorship 



often can be far worse than blue penciling 
in the open. 

The "reports" of possible infiltration of 
Pacifica followed the station's presenta- 
tion of a disenchanted agent of the Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation who was 
critical of J. Edgar Hoover. However, 
Pacifica has included a Communist com- 
mentator, identified as such, among its 
many speakers of varying political hues. 

But if Pacifica is guilty of untoward 
as distinct from unorthodox behavior in 
broadcasting, either in the matter of con- 
cealment of ownership or use of the air- 
waves for one-sidedly propagandistic pur- 
poses, ample remedies lie at hand under 
the established powers of the Federal Com- 
munications Commission. 

On the basis of the only pertinent evi- 
dence — what it has actually broadcast 
over the air — Pacifica's worst sin appears 
to have been the dissemination of off- 
beat ideas that have angered some people 
and annoyed others. The subcommittee's 
inquiry looks like an attempt to make 
Pacifica conform to a concept of speech 
that is pleasing rather than free. 



Page 1 6 



WBAI Program Folio 



sional (sic.) Orientation', i.e. connotatove mean- 
ings which — without fact or reason — we give to 
certain phrases. The title of the program comes 
from Hayakawas contention that we talk too 
much; like a juke box we sound off whenever 
someone puts a dime in the slot. The talk was 
recorded in San Francisco and was based mainly 
upon chapters in Professor Hayakawa's book, 
Language iu Thought and Action. 

10:30 MUSIC FORUM Daniel Barenboim, the young 
Israeli pianist, talks with Eric Salzman. Feb. 17 

11:30 NEWS, COMMENTARY Edward P. Morgan 

11:45 MISCELLANY OR NEWS SPECIAL 



12:00 RADIO. 



-To be heard: 



KPFA's NIGHTSOUNDS. 
4:00 SIGN-OFF 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 

8:00 HANDEL'S L'ALLEGRO ED IL PENSEROSO 

Milton Handelized and performed by Adele Addi- 
son, soprano, John McCoUum, tenor, John Rear- 
don, baritone, Albert Fuller, harpsichord, and an 
orchestra and chorus directed by Frederic Wald- 
man (Decca DXA-165). Feb. 12 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE Page 17 

10:30 BOOKS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE EUyn Beaty 
reviews books about Brotherhood. 

10:45 MATHEMATICS — PROBLEMS OF A RE- 
VISED HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM An 

unusual program directed at parents who have 
been perplexed by recent changes in the New 
York City high school mathematics curriculum. 
Jack Schwartz, economist and mathematician at 
N.Y.U. interviews Professor Melvin Hausner, 
Director of Teacher Training for the N.Y.U. 
Mathematics Institute. 

11:15 THE BIG HEWER A legend told by the men 
of the coalfields from the Tyne to the Vale of 
Neath and set into song by Ewan MacColl, with 
A. L. Lloyd, Ian Campbell, Peggy Seeger, and 
others. (BBC) 

12:15 SONGS OF AMERICAN COMPOSERS The 

first of four programs devoted to art songs by 
Americans. The performers on the recent St/and 
release are Eleanor Steber, soprano, Mildred 
Miller, mezzo-soprano, John McCollum, tenor, 
and Donald Gramm, baritone. The pianists are 
Edwin Biltcliffe and Richard Cumming. 
♦CHARLES IVES General William Booth Enters 

into Heaven (Lindsay) 
♦DOUGLAS MOORE Come Away Death 

(Shakespeare) 
♦JACK BEESON Calvinistic Evensong (Betjeman) 
♦PAUL BOWLES Blue Mountain Ballads 

(Williams) 
♦JOHN EDMUNDS The Drummer (Hardy); The 

Faucon (Anon.) 
♦JOHN ALDEN CARPENTER Looking Glass 
River (Stevenson); Jazz-Boys (Hughes) 

12:45 MISCELLANY 

12:55 'TWO' Marvin Cohen reads a series of episodes 
from his novel, parts of which have been published 
in First Person and The Beat Scene. 

2:00 JAZZ Les Davis 



4:30 THE LAST MINUTE Reserved for late arrivals 
of immediacy. 

5:30 EDINBURGH FESTIVAL, 1962 — XI The 

Boradin String Quartet with Lev Oborin, piano. 
Feb. 18 

BRITTEN Quartet No. 2 in C, Op. 36 
SHOSTAKOVICH Quintet for Piano and Strings. 
Op. 57 

6:45 'THE WOUND AND THE HEART' AUen 
Guttman of Amhurst College, author of a recently 
published intellectual history of the U.S. during 
the Spanish Civil War (Free Press) in interviewed 
by Dick Elman. 

7:15 NEW JAZZ Don Heckman 

8:15 PATTERN OF POETRY John Figueroa, West 
Indian poet and critic, reads from Hopkins, Eliot, 
Lowell, and translations from the French by D. F. 
Maclntyre. 

8:55 MISCELLANY 

8:45 RICHARD U The Life and Death of King Rich- 
ard II is a play in which the words themselves and 
the speaking of them are of the first importance. 
Much of the writing is formal, patterned and 
elaborate: verbal music, which cannot and will 
not be reduced to the bare notes of a prose tale. 
At the same time, it is a play of vivid action, 
youthful and headlong. In this BBC World Theatre 
production, produced by John Richmond, the 
words have been left as much as possible to speak 
for themselves, without much recourse to 'effects,' 
sparingly assisted by some admirable music by 
John Hotchkis. John Gielgud plays King Richard, 
Ralph Richardson is John of Gaunt. Feb. 13 

10:45 BARTOK'S DIVERTIMENTO FOR STRINGS 

♦performed by the Moscow Chamber Orchestra 
under Rudolf Barshai on a new London recording 
(6332). Feb. 14 

11:15 BARTOK'S CONCERTO FOR ORCHESTRA 

♦Erich Leinsdorf's first recording with the Boston 
Symphony (RCA 2643). Feb. 8 



12:00 RADIO_ 



-Plus the 



MIDNIGHT SPECIAL. 
4:00 SIGN-OFF 



SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 

8:00 BEETHOVEN'S OPUS 130 ♦The B[, Quartet 
performed by the Loewenguth Quartet as part of 
their recent set (Vox VBX 44). Feb. 7 

8:45 MUSIC OF LUIGI NONO The composer's Due 
Espressioni per Orchestra, "Espana en el Cora- 
zon," "Omaggio a Emilio Vedova" and Cori di 
Didone; details, Feb. 15, 8:45 p.m. 

9:30 MUSIC FORUM Eric Salzman talks with pian- 
ist Daniel Barenboim. Feb. 15 

10:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES Henry 
CoweU. Feb. 11 

11:00 POEMS BY AARON KRAMER The poet reads 
from his own work. 

11:30 FOLK SONG FROM ALL OVER A program 
with Ewan MacColl, Peggy Seeger, Enoch Kent, 
Bert Lloyd and others, recorded at the Singer's 
Club in London by Mike Tigar. Feb. 13 

1:00 SURVIVAL Mortimer Frankel reports on 
peace activities in the U.S. and abroad. Feb. 15 



1:30 MARATHON The story — in words, music and 
effects — of an unknown athlete's attempt to be- 
come Japan's representative in the Olympic mara- 
thon. It was written by Naoya Uchimura and 
translated by Geoffrey Bownas. Trevor Martin 
plays Jiro Honda and Frank Duncan plays Sasabe; 
other parts are played by members of the BBC 
Drama Repertory Company. 

2:15 PUCCINI'S LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST 

"Wiski per tutti" or Puccini's opera-cavallo. The 
thrce-acter has a libretto by Guelfo Civinini and 
Carlo Zangarini based on the wild western of 
David Belasco. In this Italian radio performance, 
the orchestra and chorus of Rome radio is under 
Arturo Basile. Feb. 13 

Minnie Renata Tebaldi 

Dick Johnson Daniele Barioni 

Jack Ranee Giangiacomo Guelfi 

Nick Piero de Palma 

Ashby Carlo Cava 

Sonora Mario Borriello 

Trin Athos Cesarini 

Sid Attilio Barbesi 

Bello John Ciavola 

Harry Angelo Mercuriali 

Joe Virginio Assandri 

Happy Egidio Casolari 

Larkens Giuseppe Morresi 

Billy Jackrabbit Giorgio Onesti 

Wowkle Lola Pedretti 

Jake Wallace Silvio Maionica 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 17 



Jose Castro Bruno Cioni 

A Coachman Angelo Mercurial] 

4:30 THE FILM ART Marcello Mastroianni, today 
Italy's top male star, talks to Gideon Bachmann 
in Rome on the set of Federico Fellini's most re- 
cent film (as yet unreleased and untitled). 

5:00 SOUNDS OF NEW YORK Produced and pre- 
pared for WBAI by Tony Schwartz. 

5:15 SCHOENBERG'S VIOLIN CONCERTO *Last 
summer WBAI broadcast the New York pre- 
miere of Stravinsky's "A Sermon, A Narrative 
and A Prayer" on a CBS concert that also in- 
cluded a fine performance of the Schoenberg 
Violin Concerto with Israel Baker as the soloist 
and the CBS Symphony under Robert Craft. That 
performance has now been issued commercially 
as part of the new Columbia set which begins 
their Schoenberg series. Feb. 15 

5:45 SCHOENBERG'S PIERROT LUNAIRE AND 
SURVIVOR FROM WARSAW* Two more works 
taken from Columbia's new Schoenberg recording 
(M2L 579). Pierrot Lunaire is performed by 
Bethany Beardslee with a chamber ensemble undtr 
the direction of Robert Craft. A Survivor from 
Warsaw has John Horton as the narrator; Robert 
Craft directs the CBS Symphony Orchestra and 



PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 

Mr. Popper's Penguins — Lew Merkelson reads the 
story by Richard and Florence Atwater (Little, 
Brown). Part One 
The Big Pond — 'The Freeze Up' (BBC) 
Weather Songs sung by Tom Glazer (Motivation 
Records) 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 

Mr. Popper's Penguins — Part Two 

An Australian Fable: 'The Little Duck Adina' (How 

the Platypus was Created) read by Else Fagrell 
Invitation to Music — prepared and narrated by 

composer Elie Siegmeister 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 

Tales from the East — Crystabel Weerasinghe 
Mr. Popper's Penguins — Part Three 
Invitation to Music — conclusion 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 

Mr. Popper's Penguins — Part Four 

•Millions of Cats' — the Wanda Gag story (BBC) 

Jeremiah Octopus by Margaret Zilboorg, read by 

Frances Barry 
Music by Villa-Lobos — 'The Surprise Box' 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 

Mr. Popper's Penguins — Conclusion 

Jean Hochberg reads Kipling's 'How the Manx Cat 

Lost its Tail' 
The Naturalist — Wales and Men (BBC) 
Thar She Blows! — Whaling songs and ballads 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 9:30-10:30 a.m. 

'The Fisherman and his Wife' — an adaptation of 
an old fairy tale, set to Debussy's 'La Mer' by 
Charles Zemalis, with Judy Brundin and Arlene 
Sagan 

Fredi Dundee reads poems about Jonathan Bing 

Songs Children Sing in France 



PEOPLE — 4:45-5:45 p.m. 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11 

'The Necklace' by Guy de Maupassant, read by 

Mary Alan Hokanson 
Good Luck Duck, a book by Meindert de Jong 

(Harper) read by Mr. deJong for WBAI children. 

Part One 
Israeli Folk Dances — Martha Schlamme 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 

Signpost to a Weather Map — written by Janet 

Nicholsberg, read by Arlene Sagan 
Good Luck Duck — conclusion 
Songs in French — Les Quatres Barbus 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 

Tales from the East — Chrystabel Weerasinghe 
'The Star Child* — Jan Dawson reads Oscar Wilde's 

story 
'The Selfish Giant' — more Oscar Wilde, read by 

John Graham 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 

Bear Stories: 'The Store Keeper's Revenge,' 'The 
Bear and the Tartans,' and 'The Possum and the 
Persimmon Tree' — all written and read by Eric 
St. Clair 
The Naturalist — Vocal Mimicry (BBC) 
'The Fisherman Who Caught the Sun* a Hawaiian 
fable read by John Graham 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 

Millie Weitz reads from A. A. Milne 

a House in Built for Eeyore* 
Danny Kaye with stories by Grimm 



'In Which 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 9:30-10:30 ajn. 

Silent Visitor, a story by Theodare Brauner (Athe- 
enum) read by Frederick Levine, who is twelve 
years old 

Circus in Town! 



Ihe Festival Singers of Toronto, Elmer Iseler, di- 
rector. This performance also stems from the CBS 
Stravinsky-Schoenberg mentioned above. For more 
Schoenberg releases from this album see Sunday 
afternoon, Feb. 10. Feb. 6 

6:30 JEREMY ROBSON The young British poet 
reads a selection of his poetry, including two 
poems with a specially-composed ja/z background. 
Mr. Robson was one of the poets presented by 
Centre 42 in its recent series of festivals in 
Britain, and some of his poems are soon to be re- 
leased on discs. This program was recorded at 
the BBC in London by MikeTigar. Feb. 14 

7:00 WARSAW AUTUMN 1962 — I Music of Karol 
Szymanowski performed by Barbara Hesse-Bu- 
kowska, piano; Stefania Woytowicz, soprano; 
Chorus and Symphony Orchestra of the Polish 
National Philharmonic under Witold Rowicki. 
Feb. 12 

Symphonie Concertante No. 4, Op. 60; Symphony 
No. .^. "Chani a la Nuit", Op. 27 

8:00 RUSSIA TODAY AND THE WORLD REVO- 
LUTION AGAINST FEUDALISM The Honor 
able William O. Douglas, Supreme Court Justice 
of the United States at the Ford Hall Forum in 
Boston. Recorded for Pacifica by station WHRB. 
Feb. II 

9:05 MISCELLANY 

9:15 HISPANIC-AMERICAN REPORT Prepared 
by Professor Ronald Hilton of Stanford Univer- 
sity's Hispanic-American, Luzo-Brazilian Insti- 
tute. Feb. 14 

9:45 MUSIC OF LEOS JANACEK 

♦Taras Bulba, Rhapsody for Orchestra 

(Czech Phil/Ancerl) (Pari 166) 
Concertino for Piano and Chamber Orchestra 

(Palenicek, ens) (Artia 1559) 
*Sinfonietta 

(Czech Phil/Ancerl) (Pari 166) 



Page 18 



WBAI Program Folio 



11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ Mail Edey continues a 
discussion (with examples) of Art Tatum. 



12:00 SIGN-OFF 



Art Galleries 



TWARDOWICZ through Feb. 9 
Starting Feb. 12 — 
ROSEMARIE BECK 



PERIDOT 



820 Madison Ave. 



(near 68th) 



FRIENDLY ART STORE 

225 West 100 Street 

MARIO JORRIN — Photographs 

Italian and Etruscan Pitchers 

Antique Sicilian Wine Casks 

Mon. - Thurs. 3-9 Sat. 1-5 





STEPHEN CSOKA 




Pastels and Drawings 




February 5 — February 23 




MERRILL Galleries 


54 East 58 Street, New York 22, N.Y., PLaza 2-6983 | 


Gallery 


hours: 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday 



Adv't 



BliOOKLYN MUSEUM ART SCHOOL 

FliEE COUNSELING FOR ANYONE WHO WANTS 
TO STUDY PAINTING AND DRAWING 

SPECIAL CLASSES FOR BEGINNERS 

ALSO SCULPTURE. CERAMICS. ENAMELING 
AND BRONZE CASTING 

/•( )U I i lUTHI.U l!\l( )RMAn( )i\ (WLI. r-JI.VlNS 8/186 - NEVINS 8-4472 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 19 



Classified — Personals 



HARPSICHORD — Same authentic instrument as 
used by Philadelphia Symphony. In kit form for 
home workshop assembly $150. Clavichord kit $100. 
Tree brochure. Write: Zuckerman Harpsichords, 
Dept. 3, 115 Christopher Street, N.Y.C. 14. 

CRIMINOLOGY BOOKS. Enormous op. stock 
on criminality, juvenile delinquency, penology. 
Search service. Big catalog, 25^. Don't just talk 
about crime — learn something about it. Patterson 
Smith. Box B-W, East Orange, N. J. 

CLASSIC GL1IT.\R taught to serious students. 
Also Folk Guitar and Five String Banjo taught in 
a musical way. Two qualified teachers. CA 8-5130. 

MUSICAM VOCARE Choral Concert with Strings 
and Soloists. Judson Hall — Feb. 3, 8:30 p.m. — 
Beethoven, Schubert, Verdi, Hindemith, others. 
Tickets: $2.25; $1.75. Write: Judson Hall, 165 West 
57th Street. 

POTTERY SALE — EXHIBITION. February '4- 
15. Mon.-Sat.: 12-5 p.m. Thurs., Fri.: 5-9 p.m. 
Greenwich House Pottery, 16 Jones Street. 

BARGAIN! U.S. Currency available — very cheap! 

From 100 to 400 crisp new 1-doIlar bills can be 
yours for a ridiculously low price — one small 
grand piano in good condition — run to your tele- 
phone: UN 5-9286 after 6 p.m. 

We have been informed by Chris Koch that the 
authorities have asked that he vacate his tent 
(pitched temporarily on Central Park South). Due 
to this unforeseen difficulty he desperately needs 
an apartment large enough to shelter his family (4 
members inclusive) perhaps you know of one that 
can be rented at a moderate price — anywhere 
Manhattan. 

Concert Pianist — pupil of Artur Schnabel 
accepting a limited number of students. 
For audition telephone TRafalgar 3-8703 

PERSONAL OUT-OF-PRINT BOOK SEARCH 
SERVICE at no extra cost. Hard-To-Find Books. 
Free Prompt Quotes. World-Wide Search. Write: 
FRANCES KLENETT, 13 Cranberry St., B'klyn 
1. N.Y. UL 2-2424 Eves. 

•POOH" PUPPET SHOW: folk songs — dances. 

available for parties. 

MILLIE WEITZ — WBAl's "Pooh" reader. 

UN 4-7960 JU 6-6300 

MATTHEW KAHAN, teacher: classic mandolin 
and guitar. Call NI 6-1000, 8-10 a.m. & p.m. 

Modem Dance for musicians, actors, artists — 
relate body movements to other arts; explore 
spatial, physical awareness; group dynamics. In- 
formation: Anna Kaufman WA 5-0573 eves, or 
write: 251 Elizabeth St., New York. 



Psychodrama: PAUL KALINA WORKSHOP 

groups or individual sessions. For particulars call 
WA 3-6315, 10:00 - 12:00 A.M. 

NEW STATESMAN: Britain's leading weekly re- 
view of current affairs, books, the arts. Direct from 
London: $9 a year by sea, $19 by air. Write Pub- 
lisher, 10 Great Turnstile, London WCl, England. 
Essential for eggheads! 

RESEARCHERS. If you have some spare time, are 
familiar with research techniques and informed on 
peace issues, you can render valuable service to 
WBAl's Survival program. Write or phone c/o 
WBAI. 

Folk Guitar and Five String Banjo Instruction — 
The Best. Bill Paler, 190 Waverly Place, New York 
14, YU 9-5537. 

We have "POOH" Wall Hangings. $3.50 Ppd. Shop- 
ping Bag, Inc., Box 58, Old Village SU., Great 
Neck, New York. 

INDIAN HILL Stockbridge, Mass. Junior and 
Senior High School, boys — girls. All sports; Music, 
Theater, Art, Dance. Olympic Size Swimming Pool. 
Inquire about "Indian Hill Abroad." Mordecai 
Bauman, director, 49 West 12th St., N. Y. C. 
CH 2-2280. 

Dynamics of Movement for actors, dancers. Per- 
sonal expression development through techniques 
of relaxation and improvisation — the key to style. 
Classes limited. 
Info through TR 3-5689 Irmgard Bartenieff 

Harpsichord — Maendler Schramm, fruitwood, 4', 
8' and bufT stops. Five octaves, three pedals. 
DE 3-1572 CN. J.) 

WBAI received an appeal in behalf of the patients 
of the Jacob Reiss Psychiatric Division of St. Vin- 
cent's Hospital — they are desperately in need of 
an FM radio — if you have an extra in working 
condition, will you contact WBAI? 

Lycanlhropes Bom — Not Made? Nonsense. Let us 

tell you how in readable, entertaining booklet. 
Mailed in furry wrapper. WBAI-Box 9 



4 out of 5 WBAI-ers 

are fed by 

GOURMART 

DEUCATESSEN 

360 Lexington Ave. (at 40th St.) 
YU 6-3430 



WBAI 99.5 FM FEBRUARY U - FEBRUARY 17, 1963. The cover photo- 
graph was taken by Lee Friedlander. From time to time we will pi-esent 
pictures which cannot help have significance to WBAI subscribers, even 
though they may not have any direct relationship to the contents of the Folio. 



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WBAI Folio 

from the 

Pacifica Radio Archives 



This ccncr sheet created b\ Internet Archi\e for ibmiatting.